Why Cannabis Will Revolutionize The Global Economy In The 21st Century

Why Cannabis Will Revolutionize The Global Economy In The 21st Century

Cannabis will revolutionize the global economy in the 21st century.

That’s not a guess. It’s not a prediction. It’s a statement of fact.

The cannabis plant is referred to as “weed” for a reason. It’s a prolific plant species. In comparison to major industrial crops like cotton, it provides much more yield while taking less out of the soil. More productive and more sustainable.

But that’s not what makes cannabis the Miracle Plant that will revolutionize the global economy in the 21st century.

What makes cannabis (potentially) the world’s most valuable and important crop is that cannabis is amazingly versatile and completely benign.

The hemp sub-species of cannabis has thousands of known industrial applications. It can literally be used to make almost anything.

Last week, The Seed Investor reported on the world’s first all-hemp airplane.
 

  • Built from a hemp fiber that is 10 times stronger than steel and lighter than conventional aircraft construction materials
  • Powered by a 100% hemp biofuel
  • Entire cabin interior was fabricated from hemp

The hemp sub-species is also a super-food, loaded with nutrition. Thus, it is capable of revolutionizing the food industry as a food additive and/or nutritional supplement.
 

  • Packed with protein (the hemp seeds contain more protein than red meat)
  • Essential fatty acids (both Omega-3 and Omega-6)
  • Loaded with a wide assortment of vitamins, minerals and fiber

Then there are the cannabinoids in cannabis. This is why cannabis is so incredibly safe/healthy.

Cannabinoids are the active ingredients in the cannabis plant. They are also produced naturally within the human body (known as endocannabinoids). They are essential to human health.

Because of this, as a medication cannabis is safer than anything – and it has already been used as a treatment for thousands of medical ailments. Cannabis is non-toxic and non-addictive, and it is not contraindicated with any other drug.

It has clear potential to revolutionize the $1 trillion per year global pharmaceuticals industry.

As a recreational drug, cannabis is also safer than anything. Tobacco causes cancer (so does alcohol). Cannabis is used to treat cancer patients.

Sleep disorders are a rising epidemic. Alcohol use makes sleep issues worse. Cannabis helps us sleep better.

Alcohol and tobacco products produce a legion of serious (and often terminal) health problems. Treating these health problems costs our governments countless billions each year.

Cannabis makes people healthier. Potential savings on healthcare spending are astronomical as consumers move away from alcohol/tobacco and toward cannabis.

Big Alcohol and Big Tobacco can see this consumer trend. Both have begun to aggressively buy their way into the cannabis industry. Constellation Brands (US:STZ). Molson Coors (US:TAP). Altria (US:MO). Imperial Brands (LON:IMB).

Those are just moves into the Canadian cannabis industry. When the U.S.’s antiquated federal Prohibition on cannabis is finally ended, the trend by Big Alcohol and Big Tobacco will become a stampede.

Most governments and the mainstream media remain completely clueless about this Miracle Plant. But consumers are flocking to cannabis.

Yesterday, The Seed Investor reported on the massive increase in cannabis usage in the United States since the beginning of the century.

But instead of embracing this positive consumer trend, the mainstream media framed this information as if it was something we should fear and dread.
 

America’s gone to pot, with the number of marijuana smokers spiking dramatically— even in states where it’s illegal — in recent years, a new study shows.

The number of folks who admitted to monthly weed use in states where the drug isn’t allowed recreationally has soared 33 percent since 2002, according to an analysis of federal data by the Rockefeller Institute of Government.

Even more bullish (for investors) is data on consumer behavior toward cannabis among Americans. A July 2019 Leafly article provides a wealth of data (from 21 U.S. states where cannabis is at least partially legal).
 

  • 49% reduced their use of over-the-counter drugs as a result of consuming cannabis
  • 52% reduced their prescription drug use
  • 37% reported reducing their alcohol use (most surveys actually put this number much higher)

And cannabis appeals to all age groups.

While the majority of “frequent shoppers” for cannabis are younger people (58% between 21 and 34 years old), more than a third (35%) are aged 35 to 54. Of consumers who don’t currently purchase cannabis, older Americans actually account for the largest percentage of “Acceptors”, cannabis-curious consumers who are considering trying cannabis.

“Baby boomers that are not purchasing marijuana are 60% more likely than millennials to consider it.”

Of these Acceptors:
 

  • 77% said they would use cannabis to relieve a medical issue (63% cited chronic/recurring pain)
  • 46% would use cannabis to ease stress or anxiety
  • 41% would try cannabis simply “to have a better quality of life”

The Seed Investor has been on top of this strong (and massive) shift in support for cannabis usage among Americans. In a recent article, we explained how and why cannabis is becoming a new “consumer tradition” in the United States.

Then there is the mainstream media.

Instead of looking forward toward the amazing growth potential of cannabis and the cannabis industry, the mainstream media continually looks backward – and with a relentlessly anti-cannabis bias.

A new Bloomberg article epitomizes this negative media reporting and complete lack of understanding of cannabis and cannabis investors.
 

No. Wrong.

Investors in cannabis are in this space precisely because of the incredible future potential – thanks to 100 years of cannabis Prohibition. They (naturally) look ahead to revenue growth potential, not backwards at previous earnings.

It’s only the clueless cannabis-haters in the mainstream media who focus exclusively on bottom-line profits. At the same time, the mainstream media never makes any attempt to identify why revenue and profit growth have been disappointing to date: government.

Only one U.S. state government – Colorado – has shown the ability to provide a sensible and efficient regulatory framework for the cannabis industry. A few other Western states (such as Washington and Oregon) are doing some things right.

Elsewhere, even the states that have partially or completely legalized cannabis are doing almost everything wrong. Over-taxation. Over-regulation. Lack of retail access.

In contrast, Canada’s cannabis industry appears to have “turned the corner”: three consecutive months of double-digit growth .

Why? Canada’s provinces (notably Ontario) have also been slow and inefficient in opening up (legal) cannabis commerce. But they are finally beginning to provide the Canadian cannabis industry – and cannabis consumers – with a reasonable level of access to retail cannabis stores.

This revenue growth is just beginning to show up in Canadian cannabis earnings. Next quarter is when cannabis investors will see these big sales numbers reflected in quarterly earnings.

Cannabis valuations are in a severe trough. This is the result of myopic and backward-looking analysis from the mainstream media on the cannabis industry, in what are supposed to forward-looking markets.

When much stronger earnings numbers start to show up on (first) the balance sheets of Canadian cannabis companies, valuations are going to start correcting sharply higher. This provides investors with an extremely attractive window at present to capitalize on this disconnect.
 

Published at Tue, 13 Aug 2019 10:00:00 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

Supreme Cannabis Provides Guidance for Positive Fourth Quarter 2019 and Fiscal 2020

Supreme Cannabis Provides Guidance for Positive Fourth Quarter 2019 and Fiscal 2020

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc. (TSX: FIRE) (OTCQX: SPRWF) (FRA: 53S1) today announced its expected revenue for the fiscal fourth quarter ended June 30, 2019 and provided guidance for fiscal 2020. Supreme Cannabis’ expects to release the Company’s audited fourth quarter and annual results on September 17, 2019.

The Company anticipates that revenue from the fourth quarter will be approximately $19 million net of excise tax. Based on preliminary results, fourth quarter 2019 revenue is expected to mark an increase of approximately 449% over Q4 2018 revenue ($3.55 million) and is expected to be an approximately 97% increase over Q3 2019 revenue ($9.9 million), thereby expecting to nearly double revenue quarter over quarter (see graph). Supreme Cannabis expects continued revenue growth throughout 2020 as 7ACRES scales production, new and higher-margin products are introduced, and additional brands begin generating material revenue. As a capital-efficient operator, Supreme Cannabis also anticipates reporting positive Adjusted EBITDA1 on a consolidated basis for fourth quarter 2019.

“Our Company has taken deliberate steps to grow in a focused, responsible and compliant manner, building a strong core business and an authentic brand and then expanding into new lines of business and international markets,” said Navdeep Dhaliwal, CEO of Supreme Cannabis. “In a sector dominated by headlines, our measured approach to capital deployment and brand-building sets us apart. We believe our preliminary results demonstrate the strength of our business during an inflection point within the industry, path towards profitability and continued disciplined growth. Looking forward, we remain focused on building our portfolio of premium consumer experience driven brands.”

Brands, Partnerships and Operations

Over the last year, Supreme Cannabis has built a focused portfolio of brands and operating assets to serve diverse consumer experiences and emerging product categories.

  • 7ACRES: Growing premium cannabis at scale from a 440,000 square foot indoor hybrid facility.
  • Blissco: Established premium wellness brand expected to produce over 7,000,000 tincture bottles annually by December 2019 and focus on Global CBD markets.
  • PAX: Partnership to launch premium 7ACRES oil pods for the PAX Era in Canada.
  • Truverra2: International evidence based medical brand with Health Canada-licensed facility for research and development.
  • KKE: Ultra-premium lineup of cannabis products for the Canadian and international cannabis enthusiasts, developed in partnership with Wiz Khalifa and Khalifa Kush Enterprises Canada.
  • Medigrow: Producing full spectrum CBD and medical cannabis oil products for international markets from a low-cost jurisdiction in Southern Africa.
  • Supreme Heights2: Investment platform focused on early stage brands in the UK and European CBD health and wellness market.
  • Cambium Plant Sciences: Research and development facility focused on developing the next generation of premium cannabis genetics and proprietary cultivation processes.

Outlook

Supreme Cannabis believes that the Company is well positioned to take significant steps forward in fiscal 2020, including:

  • Expected net revenue of between $150 million and $180 million.
  • Expected positive Adjusted EBITDA1 on aggregate over the course of the year.
  • 7ACRES’ to complete its transition from a wholesale business to premium consumer brand by third quarter fiscal 2020, with complete in-house packaging capabilities for all flower products under the 7ACRES’ brand.
  • Pursuing non-dilutive financing with tier-one banks and other lenders to provide financial flexibility for future growth initiatives.
  • Fully funded to execute on all planned initiatives.

In addition to the above outlook, the Company has determined not to exercise its option to pursue a consolidation of its issued and outstanding Common Shares.

See “Forward-Looking Information” below for assumptions and risks.

Fourth Quarter Earnings Release

The Company will release its audited financial results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended June 30, 2019 after financial markets close on September 17, 2019.

Financial Disclaimer

The preliminary estimated financial results and other data for the three months and year ended June 30, 2019 set forth above are subject to the completion of the Company’s financial closing procedures. This data has been prepared by, and is the responsibility of, the Company’s management and audit committee. Supreme Cannabis’ independent registered public accounting firm, MNP LLP, is in the process of performing year-end audit procedures with respect to the accompanying preliminary financial results and other data, and accordingly does not express an opinion or any other form of assurance with respect thereto. The Company currently expects that its final results of operations and other data will be consistent with the estimates set forth above, but such estimates are preliminary and Supreme Cannabis’ actual results of operations and other data could differ materially from these estimates due to the completion of its fiscal year-end audit procedures, final adjustments, and other developments that may arise between now and the time such annual audited consolidated financial statements for the twelve months ended June 30, 2019 are released.

1The Company defines Adjusted EBITDA as net income (loss) excluding interest income (expense), accretion, income taxes, depreciation, amortization, fair value changes on growth of biological assets, realized fair value changes on inventory sold or impaired, share-based payments, changes in fair value of financial instruments, gains and losses on disposal of assets, and impairment of goodwill and intangible assets. A reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to Net Income (Loss) will be provided in the Company’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis for the year ended June 30, 2019.

2Truverra and Supreme Heights transactions are subject to customary closing conditions.

About Supreme Cannabis

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc., is a global diversified portfolio of distinct cannabis companies, products and brands. Since 2014, the Company has emerged as one of the world’s fastest-growing, premium plant driven-lifestyle companies by effectively deploying capital, with an emphasis on disciplined growth and high-quality products.

Supreme Cannabis’ portfolio includes 7ACRES, its wholly-owned subsidiary and multi-award-winning brand; Blissco Cannabis Corp., a wellness cannabis brand and a multi-licensed processor and distributor based in British Columbia; Cambium Plant Sciences, a plant genetics and cultivation IP company; Medigrow Lesotho, an cannabis oil producer located in southern Africa; Supreme Heights, an investment platform focused on CBD brands in the UK and Europe and a brand partnership and licensing deal with Khalifa Kush Enterprises Canada.

Supreme trades as FIRE on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: FIRE), SPRWF on the OTC Exchange in the United States (OTCQX: SPRWF) and 53S1 on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange (FRA: 53S1). Follow us on InstagramTwitter, Facebook and YouTube.

We simply grow better.

Forward-Looking Information

Certain statements made in this press release may constitute forward-looking information under applicable securities laws. These statements may relate to anticipated events or results and include, but are not limited to, to report net revenue for the quarter and year end and positive Adjusted EBITDA for fourth quarter 2019, our ability to create shareholder value and other statements that are not historical facts. Particularly, information regarding our expectations of future results, targets, performance achievements, prospects or opportunities is forward-looking information. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “believe”, “estimate”, “plan”, “could”, “should”, “would”, “outlook”, “forecast”, “anticipate”, “foresee”, “continue” or the negative of these terms or variations of them or similar terminology.

Implicit in forward-looking statements in respect of the Company’s expectations for fiscal 2020 to deliver $150 million to $180 million in revenue and positive Adjusted EBITDA, 7ACRES’ to complete its transition from a wholesale business to premium consumer brand by third quarter fiscal 2020; pursuing debt financing with tier-one banks and other lenders; and being fully funded to execute on all planned initiatives, are certain current assumptions, including, among others, the increase in product volume available for sale while sustaining current selling prices, the transition of all cannabis products to recreational sales channels, the introduction of new products, and cash production costs and operating expenses increasing at a lower rate than revenues due to the realization of efficiencies throughout the Company as resulted of scaled operations. Assumptions also include that the Company maintains its Health Canada licenses in good standing and obtains new licenses as necessary.

In addition, this press release makes reference to certain non-IFRS measures, including certain industry metrics. These metrics and measures are not recognized measures under IFRS, do not have meanings prescribed under IFRS and are as a result unlikely to be comparable to similar measures presented by other companies. These measures are provided as information complimentary to those IFRS measures by providing a further understanding of our operating results from the perspective of management. As such, these measures should not be considered in isolation or in lieu of review of Company’s financial information reported under IFRS. This press release uses non-IFRS measures including “EBITDA”, “Adjusted EBITDA”, commonly used operating measures in the industry but may be calculated differently compared to other companies in the industry. These non-IFRS measures, including the industry measures, are used to provide investors with supplementary measures of our operating performance that may not otherwise be apparent when relying solely on IFRS metrics. Definitions of the non-IFRS measures can be found in the Company’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019.

Forward-looking statements are current as of the date they are made and are based on applicable estimates and assumptions made by us at the relevant time in light of our experience and perception of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments, as well as other factors that we believe are appropriate and reasonable in the circumstances. However, we do not undertake to update any such forward-looking information whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required under applicable securities laws in Canada. There can be no assurance that such estimates and assumptions will prove to be correct.

Many factors could cause our actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements or future events or developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, the factors discussed in the “Risk Factors” section of the Company’s Annual Information Form dated October 2, 2018 (“AIF”). A copy of the AIF and the Company’s other publicly filed documents can be accessed under the Company’s profile on the System for Electronic Document Analysis and Retrieval (“SEDAR”) at www.sedar.com. The Company cautions that the list of risk factors and uncertainties described in the AIF is not exhaustive and other factors could also adversely affect its results. Readers are urged to consider the risks, uncertainties and assumptions carefully in evaluating the forward-looking information and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such information.

The Supreme Cannabis Company's FY 2019 Revenue Growth (CNW Group/The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc.)

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc (CNW Group/The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc.) (CNW Group/The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc.)

Cision

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SOURCE The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc.

Published at Tue, 13 Aug 2019 11:58:32 +0000

Marijuana Stocks Monday Morning Update – August 12, 2019

Marijuana Stocks Monday Morning Update – August 12, 2019



Marijuana Stocks Monday Morning Update – August 12, 2019 – Marijuana Stocks | Cannabis Investments and News. Roots of a Budding Industry.™






























Published at Mon, 12 Aug 2019 12:21:38 +0000

U.S. Cannabis Demand Continues to Soar

U.S. Cannabis Demand Continues to Soar

A NY Post article reported on rising usage of cannabis in the United States. It provides cannabis investors with an interesting snapshot of the potential of the cannabis industry in two respects.

Since 2002, cannabis consumption has risen by 47 percent in cannabis-legal states, according to a survey conducted by the Rockefeller Institute. Even in states that have not legalized cannabis, usage has risen by an average of 33 percent.

For cannabis investors, these are strongly positive numbers. But note the predictably primitive manner in which the NY Post expresses this data.
 

America’s gone to pot, with the number of marijuana smokers spiking dramatically— even in states where it’s illegal — in recent years, a new study shows.

The number of folks who admitted to monthly weed use in states where the drug isn’t allowed recreationally has soared 33 percent since 2002, according to an analysis of federal data by the Rockefeller Institute of Government.

And the increase is even, well, higher — 47 percent — in states where lighting up is legal, according to the sprawling survey of all 50 states.

“America’s gone to pot…”

“The number of folks who admitted to monthly weed use…”

Hilarious.

More enlightened readers know that cannabis is a safe, healthy substance. The cannabinoids in the cannabis plant (the active ingredients) are also produced naturally within the human body.

Cannabinoids are essential to our health. Their properties are very similar to those of vitamins.

Imagine the NY Post was writing an article about vitamin C consumption. How ludicrous would it appear if it wrote the article in the following terms?
 

America’s gone to oranges, with the number of vitamin C users spiking dramatically – even in states where it’s illegal – in recent years, a new study shows.

The number of folks who admitted to monthly orange consumption where vitamin C isn’t allowed recreationally has soared 33 percent since 2002…

The mainstream media has been “warning” us about safe, benign cannabis for 100 years. Even as cannabis is legalized state-by-state (and soon nationally), apparently these vacuous warnings are going to continue.

Back in the real world, cannabis is rapidly becoming a popular consumer trend among Americans. It is becoming the recreational drug-of-choice among educated professionals – precisely because it is so much safer and healthier than the legal alternatives: alcohol and tobacco.

The problem standing in the way of all this legal consumer demand (and potential investor profits) is government.

States across the U.S. (and provinces in Canada) insist that “eliminating the cannabis black market” is one of their top priorities as they legalize pot. But (in most cases) their actions totally undermine this goal.

They over-tax cannabis. They over-regulate cannabis. They provide inadequate retail access.

In California, voters demanded that cannabis be legal by state ballot. But the gutless state government has allowed local governments to opt in (or opt out) of legalizing cannabis.

Nearly 90% of California counties still have some level of cannabis Prohibition in place. California compounds this folly by over-taxing cannabis and creating a steadily shifting maze of regulations for the legal industry.

As a result, California’s cannabis black market continues to claim 60% of market share. Those are revenue dollars that should be flowing into the pockets of (legal) cannabis companies – and their shareholders. Those are additional tax dollars that should be flooding into state coffers.

Instead, California’s government has regressed to the failed thinking of the 1980’s with a new War on Drugs. It’s spending vast amounts of tax dollars attacking its cannabis black market, even though this heavy-handed law enforcement operation is doomed to failure.

Nearby, Colorado is already winning the battle against the cannabis black market without spending a dime. Just reasonable taxation and industry-friendly regulation.

Colorado has the largest, healthiest cannabis industry in the United States (in proportionate terms). It has the smallest cannabis black market.

Scrape away the anti-cannabis hysteria of the NY Post and cannabis investors get a glimpse of the potential of cannabis demand in the United States.

It’s rapidly becoming more popular even in states where cannabis is illegal as consumers (increasingly) ignore antiquated anti-cannabis laws. It’s America’s 21st century Tea Party.

Anti-cannabis U.S. states, the federal government, and all these politicians seeking re-election can continue to oppose this New Tea Party at their own peril.

For cannabis investors, the message is also clear. Cannabis demand can only go up. Current revenues for the legal cannabis industry remain just the tip of the iceberg in terms of the potential size of this market.

Cannabis stock valuations across North America continue to lag these positive fundamentals. Sophisticated investors will easily recognize the opportunity here.
 

Published at Mon, 12 Aug 2019 10:00:00 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

Charlotte’s Web Holding Inc. (OTCMKTS:CWBHF) Announces Extension Of Research Initiative with The Centre For Discovery

Charlotte’s Web Holding Inc. (OTCMKTS:CWBHF) Announces Extension Of Research Initiative with The Centre For Discovery

Charlotte’s
Web Holding Inc. (OTCMKTS:CWBHF)
has reportedly extended its research initiative with The Centre for
Discovery in New York to continue advancing the development of hemp strain for
improved farming in the area.

Charlotte’s
Web expanding beyond New York

The ground-breaking initiative has helped
the company solidify its expansion in the Eastern Appalachian Region through
the determination of the best hemp varieties that can do well under the local
terrain and regional microclimate. The project which is in its third year has
helped steer the Charlotte Web’s breeding in the production of improved hemp
varieties that will be vital in helping farmers get better yields. The
production of superior hemp varieties has equally helped the company position
itself well for success in the New York region and nearing states that have
same growing conditions.

Charlotte’s Web is also in partnership with
Kentucky farmers to produce improved hemp strains for its CBD products.
Recently the company announced that it was carrying out an organic hemp farming
research initiative with Rodale Institute and Natural care in the state of
Pennsylvania.

Charlotte’s Web CEO Deanie Elsner indicated
that the company is committed to developing premium quality hemp genetics
improved for cultivation in New York and the surrounding areas. He added that
The Centre for Discovery is one of the most recognized institutions globally
for its innovative work in advancing ground-breaking farming practices.

Transition
to organic hemp farming

The Centre of Discovery is known for its
work in the treatment of individuals with complex disabilities and it has been
recognized as a center for excellence in the state of New York. The center is
currently growing hemp through biodynamic farming practices which is an
enhanced standard of conventional organic farming. The joint initiative between
Charlotte’s Web and the center is part of the company’s corporate social
responsibility and it shows its commitment towards enhancing of sustainable
hemp farming.

The company in the last five years has been
trying to change from conventional hemp farming to organic hemp farming. It
already has certified organic farms as it continues to seek more organic
certifications for its CBD products.

Published at Mon, 12 Aug 2019 12:01:36 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

How to Staff a Cannabis Retail Operation

How to Staff a Cannabis Retail Operation

eCann Media is proud to showcase our portfolio of investments and subsidiaries. We have completed numerous investments across multiple verticals and sectors in the cannabis industry. Requesting an invitation will enable the eCann team to consider your eligibility for investment as well help us to identify the opportunities that best fit your needs and investment objectives.

Published at Wed, 07 Aug 2019 18:30:00 +0000




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