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Canopy Growth Announces Acquisition of KeyLeaf Life Sciences to Support Long-Term Major Scale Extraction Needs

Canopy Growth Announces Acquisition of KeyLeaf Life Sciences to Support Long-Term Major Scale Extraction Needs

Canopy Growth Corporation (TSX:WEED, NYSE:CGC) is pleased to announce that it has completed a transaction to acquire Saskatoon-based bio-product extractor KeyLeaf Life Sciences, related entities, and intellectual property. Canopy Growth has been working closely with KeyLeaf – formerly known as POS Bio-Sciences – as a trusted partner building out extraction processes and technology for the past year as it refines its scale extraction model for Canadian and global markets. As previously disclosed, Canopy Growth assumed control of KeyLeaf for accounting purposes in November 2018. As such, KeyLeaf’s financial results were consolidated in the Company’s fiscal 2019 financial statements. Through the transaction the Company is acquiring a large-scale Canadian extraction facility as well as an extraction-related facility in the United States to support the Company’s U.S. CBD expansion.

With over 45 years of experience in the canola, nutraceutical, cosmetic, and bio-product industries, KeyLeaf is a recognized leading authority with significant intellectual property relating to plant-based extraction and ingredients. The extensive experience of KeyLeaf’s chemists, engineers, and operators will remain within the organization to further refine the cannabinoid extraction process and will support Canopy Growth in the design, training, oversight, and implementation of additional extraction sites around the world.

KeyLeaf has been working closely with Canopy Growth over the past year to retrofit its Saskatchewan facility to advance technology development and commercialization, in order to process hemp and cannabis biomass, and to conduct pre- and post-extraction processes. It is anticipated the facility, which is currently in the Health Canada licensing process, will be able to process up to 5,000 kg of input materials daily when operational.

Canopy Growth intends to leverage this facility, along with other owned and partner extraction options, to process its over 5,000 acres of Canadian CBD hemp production, over 160 acres of outdoor cannabis production, as well as any extraction materials outputted from its over 4 million square feet of greenhouse growing operations. Then it’s off to Smiths Falls to produce the best possible, IP-protected products out there!

Additionally, the acquisition includes KeyLeaf’s ingredient science and innovation industrial scale facility in Batavia, Illinois. The Batavia facility focuses on short path distillation and the concentration of key compounds, ensuring that the output is free of impurities in products intended for consumption and currently holds several certifications, including a US FDA Food Facility Registration, as well as a state hemp processing licence, and Silliker GMP and Food Safety Systems Audit. As the Company builds its U.S. operations, this facility will be key in executing our program to bring CBD products to market in the U.S. by the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020 and will process the extract required to provide Canopy Growth with the supply needed to sustain these products.

“The KeyLeaf operations and team deliver instant scale at a pivotal stage in our growth, with brand new products coming to market later this year requiring sophisticated extraction capabilities at scale,” said Bruce Linton, Chairman & co-CEO, Canopy Growth Corporation. “This acquisition is the result of a year’s worth of work with a trusted partner, and part of our commitment to always staying a step ahead as leaders in a nascent industry, focused on the long-game one piece at a time.”

Here’s to Future (extracted) Growth.

About Canopy Growth Corporation
Canopy Growth (TSX:WEED, NYSE:CGC) is a world-leading diversified cannabis, hemp and cannabis device company, offering distinct brands and curated cannabis varieties in dried, oil and Softgel capsule forms, as well as medical devices through Canopy Growth’s subsidiary, Storz & Bickel GMbH & Co. KG. From product and process innovation to market execution, Canopy Growth is driven by a passion for leadership and a commitment to building a world-class cannabis company one product, site and country at a time. Canopy Growth has operations in over a dozen countries across five continents.

Canopy Growth’s medical division, Spectrum Therapeutics is proudly dedicated to educating healthcare practitioners, conducting robust clinical research, and furthering the public’s understanding of cannabis, and has devoted millions of dollars toward cutting edge, commercializable research and IP development. Spectrum Therapeutics sells a range of full-spectrum products using its colour-coded classification Spectrum system as well as single cannabinoid Dronabinol under the brand Bionorica Ethics.

Canopy Growth operates retail stores across Canada under its award-winning Tweed and Tokyo Smoke banners. Tweed is a globally recognized cannabis brand which has built a large and loyal following by focusing on quality products and meaningful customer relationships.

From our historic public listing on the Toronto Stock Exchange and New York Stock Exchange to our continued international expansion, pride in advancing shareholder value through leadership is engrained in all we do at Canopy Growth. Canopy Growth has established partnerships with leading sector names including cannabis icons Snoop Dogg and Seth Rogen, breeding legends DNA Genetics and Green House Seeds, and Fortune 500 alcohol leader Constellation Brands, to name but a few. Canopy Growth operates eleven licensed cannabis production sites with over 4.7 million square feet of production capacity, including over one million square feet of GMP certified production space. For more information visit www.canopygrowth.com

Notice Regarding Forward Looking Statements
This news release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements and information can be identified by the use of words such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “estimates”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, or “believes”, or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results “may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken, occur or be achieved. Forward-looking statements or information involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Canopy Growth or its subsidiaries to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements or information contained in this news release. Examples of such statements include statements with respect to future product format offerings and throughput capabilities. Risks, uncertainties and other factors involved with forward-looking information could cause actual events, results, performance, prospects and opportunities to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking information, including the Company’s ability to satisfy provincial sales contracts or provinces purchasing all cannabis allocated to them, and such risks contained in the Company’s annual information form dated June 27, 2018 and filed with Canadian securities regulators available on the Company’s issuer profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. Although the Company believes that the assumptions and factors used in preparing the forward-looking information or forward-looking statements in this news release are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on such information and no assurance can be given that such events will occur in the disclosed time frames or at all. The forward-looking information and forward-looking statements included in this news release are made as of the date of this news release and the Company does not undertake an obligation to publicly update such forward-looking information or forward-looking statements to reflect new information, subsequent events or otherwise unless required by applicable securities laws.

About KeyLeaf
KeyLeaf Life Sciences is a global ingredient and process technology company established over 45 years ago. Headquartered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, KeyLeaf is recognized around the world as a trusted expert in plant-based bioprocessing. KeyLeaf has worked with over 800 companies from 40 countries and continues to increase Saskatchewan’s global visibility as a hub for innovation.

Canopy Growth Announces Acquisition of KeyLeaf Life Sciences to Support Long-Term Major Scale Extraction Needs (CNW Group/Canopy Growth Corporation)

Cision View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/canopy-growth-announces-acquisition-of-keyleaf-life-sciences-to-support-long-term-major-scale-extraction-needs-300875362.html

SOURCE Canopy Growth Corporation

View original content to download multimedia: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/June2019/26/c0418.html

Canopy Growth Corporation Contact: Caitlin O’Hara, Media Relations, Caitlin.Ohara@canopygrowth.com, 613-291-3239; Investor Relations, Tyler Burns, Tyler.Burns@canopygrowth.com, 855-558-9333 ext. 122; KeyLeaf Life Sciences Contact: Justin White, Vice-President Global Sales and Business Development, 306-978-2800Copyright CNW Group 2019

Source: Canada Newswire (June 26, 2019 – 9:00 AM EDT)

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Published at Wed, 26 Jun 2019 13:23:07 +0000

Canopy Growth Announces Acquisition of KeyLeaf Life Sciences to Support Extraction Needs

Canopy Growth Announces Acquisition of KeyLeaf Life Sciences to Support Extraction Needs

SMITHS FALLS, ON, June 26, 2019 /CNW/ – Canopy Growth Corporation (“Canopy Growth” or the “Company”) (TSX:WEED, NYSE:CGC) is pleased to announce that it has completed a transaction to acquire Saskatoon-based bio-product extractor KeyLeaf Life Sciences (“KeyLeaf”), related entities, and intellectual property. Canopy Growth has been working closely with KeyLeaf – formerly known as POS Bio-Sciences – as a trusted partner building out extraction processes and technology for the past year as it refines its scale extraction model for Canadian and global markets. As previously disclosed, Canopy Growth assumed control of KeyLeaf for accounting purposes in November 2018. As such, KeyLeaf’s financial results were consolidated in the Company’s fiscal 2019 financial statements. Through the transaction the Company is acquiring a large-scale Canadian extraction facility as well as an extraction-related facility in the United States to support the Company’s U.S. CBD expansion.

With over 45 years of experience in the canola, nutraceutical, cosmetic, and bio-product industries, KeyLeaf is a recognized leading authority with significant intellectual property relating to plant-based extraction and ingredients. The extensive experience of KeyLeaf’s chemists, engineers, and operators will remain within the organization to further refine the cannabinoid extraction process and will support Canopy Growth in the design, training, oversight, and implementation of additional extraction sites around the world.

KeyLeaf has been working closely with Canopy Growth over the past year to retrofit its Saskatchewan facility to advance technology development and commercialization, in order to process hemp and cannabis biomass, and to conduct pre- and post-extraction processes.  It is anticipated the facility, which is currently in the Health Canada licensing process, will be able to process up to 5,000 kg of input materials daily when operational.

Canopy Growth intends to leverage this facility, along with other owned and partner extraction options, to process its over 5,000 acres of Canadian CBD hemp production, over 160 acres of outdoor cannabis production, as well as any extraction materials outputted from its over 4 million square feet of greenhouse growing operations.  Then it’s off to Smiths Falls to produce the best possible, IP-protected products out there!

Additionally, the acquisition includes KeyLeaf’s ingredient science and innovation industrial scale facility in Batavia, Illinois. The Batavia facility focuses on short path distillation and the concentration of key compounds, ensuring that the output is free of impurities in products intended for consumption and currently holds several certifications, including a US FDA Food Facility Registration, as well as a state hemp processing licence, and Silliker GMP and Food Safety Systems Audit. As the Company builds its U.S. operations, this facility will be key in executing our program to bring CBD products to market in the U.S. by the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020 and will process the extract required to provide Canopy Growth with the supply needed to sustain these products.

“The KeyLeaf operations and team deliver instant scale at a pivotal stage in our growth, with brand new products coming to market later this year requiring sophisticated extraction capabilities at scale,” said Bruce Linton, Chairman & co-CEO, Canopy Growth Corporation. “This acquisition is the result of a year’s worth of work with a trusted partner, and part of our commitment to always staying a step ahead as leaders in a nascent industry, focused on the long-game one piece at a time.”

Here’s to Future (extracted) Growth.

About Canopy Growth Corporation
Canopy Growth (TSX:WEED, NYSE:CGC) is a world-leading diversified cannabis, hemp and cannabis device company, offering distinct brands and curated cannabis varieties in dried, oil and Softgel capsule forms, as well as medical devices through Canopy Growth’s subsidiary, Storz & Bickel GMbH & Co. KG. From product and process innovation to market execution, Canopy Growth is driven by a passion for leadership and a commitment to building a world-class cannabis company one product, site and country at a time. Canopy Growth has operations in over a dozen countries across five continents.

Canopy Growth’s medical division, Spectrum Therapeutics is proudly dedicated to educating healthcare practitioners, conducting robust clinical research, and furthering the public’s understanding of cannabis, and has devoted millions of dollars toward cutting edge, commercializable research and IP development. Spectrum Therapeutics sells a range of full-spectrum products using its colour-coded classification Spectrum system as well as single cannabinoid Dronabinol under the brand Bionorica Ethics.

Canopy Growth operates retail stores across Canada under its award-winning Tweed and Tokyo Smoke banners. Tweed is a globally recognized cannabis brand which has built a large and loyal following by focusing on quality products and meaningful customer relationships.

From our historic public listing on the Toronto Stock Exchange and New York Stock Exchange to our continued international expansion, pride in advancing shareholder value through leadership is engrained in all we do at Canopy Growth. Canopy Growth has established partnerships with leading sector names including cannabis icons Snoop Dogg and Seth Rogen, breeding legends DNA Genetics and Green House Seeds, and Fortune 500 alcohol leader Constellation Brands, to name but a few. Canopy Growth operates eleven licensed cannabis production sites with over 4.7 million square feet of production capacity, including over one million square feet of GMP certified production space. For more information visit www.canopygrowth.com

Notice Regarding Forward Looking Statements
This news release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements and information can be identified by the use of words such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “estimates”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, or “believes”, or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results “may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken, occur or be achieved. Forward-looking statements or information involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Canopy Growth or its subsidiaries to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements or information contained in this news release. Examples of such statements include statements with respect to future product format offerings and throughput capabilities. Risks, uncertainties and other factors involved with forward-looking information could cause actual events, results, performance, prospects and opportunities to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking information, including the Company’s ability to satisfy provincial sales contracts or provinces purchasing all cannabis allocated to them, and such risks contained in the Company’s annual information form dated June 27, 2018 and filed with Canadian securities regulators available on the Company’s issuer profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. Although the Company believes that the assumptions and factors used in preparing the forward-looking information or forward-looking statements in this news release are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on such information and no assurance can be given that such events will occur in the disclosed time frames or at all. The forward-looking information and forward-looking statements included in this news release are made as of the date of this news release and the Company does not undertake an obligation to publicly update such forward-looking information or forward-looking statements to reflect new information, subsequent events or otherwise unless required by applicable securities laws.

About KeyLeaf
KeyLeaf Life Sciences is a global ingredient and process technology company established over 45 years ago. Headquartered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, KeyLeaf is recognized around the world as a trusted expert in plant-based bioprocessing. KeyLeaf has worked with over 800 companies from 40 countries and continues to increase Saskatchewan’s global visibility as a hub for innovation.

SOURCE Canopy Growth Corporation

Published at Wed, 26 Jun 2019 14:16:12 +0000

Is Growing Cannabis as Easy as it Looks?

Is Growing Cannabis as Easy as it Looks?

With legislation allowing the growth of legal cannabis in many states throughout the U.S., many have wondered how easy it really is to grow marijuana. One of the biggest pulls for deciding to grow cannabis on one’s own is the fact that taxes still remain quite high in most of the states that have legalized the substance thus far.

With the accessibility of knowledge to grow cannabis on the rise, it seems as though marijuana horticulture is one of the best ways to combat the high prices of the substance in the current day.

Is Your Climate Right for Growing Marijuana?

One of the most important factors to growing weed outdoors is the climate in which one is growing. Cannabis is a plant that can adapt greatly to varying climates, but this does not mean any area is suitable for growing weed.

Just as cold temperatures in the 50s can stunt a plants growth, extremely high temperatures can also do the same. Additionally, large amounts of wind and rain can physically damage a plant as well as reducing the overall amount of the substance that can be produced in a given yield.

Another important factor to consider is how much daylight a plant will get. In more northern latitudes, plants will be able to get more sunlight upwards of 15 hours per day, with southern latitudes reducing that by a few hours. This also changes depending on the time of year as well.

Which Marijuana Plants Should You Grow?

Just as there are a variety of types of vegetables and plants, marijuana comes in a large range of strains. These strains can all grow differently depending on the climate, and some are more suited to certain areas than others. One of the good rules of thumb to live by is if others are growing weed in your area, there’s a good chance yours will grow as well.

Keep in mind that some strains are made specifically to be grown in certain regions. One of the best resources is a local dispensary. At these businesses, those behind the counter often have experience growing the plant and can steer you in the right direction in terms of strain and whether or not the substance can grow in a given area.

What to Grow In?

The cannabis plant can grow quite easily in the right climate, but it also depends heavily on the makeup of the soil being used. Soil is made up of several different compounds such as clay and sand.

These compounds in varying mixes can aid or destroy a plant. Cannabis plants need to have a large amount of organic matter as well as a solid way to drain excess water to prevent drowning the plant. If all of this is researched, it may make it easier than ever to grow a marijuana plant.

The reality is that growing marijuana is not nearly as hard as some make it seem. With the proper research and materials, marijuana growth may be able to work for anyone, and save you a few bucks in the process.

Published at Wed, 26 Jun 2019 12:51:17 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

Canaccord Genuity Releases Company Update Research Report on CLS Holdings USA, Inc. (CLSH) (CLSH.CN)

Canaccord Genuity Releases Company Update Research Report on CLS Holdings USA, Inc. (CLSH) (CLSH.CN)

Canaccord Genuity, the largest independent investment dealer in Canada, has released a company update research report on CLS Holdings USA, Inc. (CLSH) (CLSH.CN). The report was published on June 20, 2019 and was written by Bobby Burleson, Analyst, and Jonathan DeCourcey, Associate.

About Canaccord Genuity

Canaccord Genuity Group Inc. is a global, full-service investment banking and financial services company that specializes in wealth management and brokerage in the capital markets. It is the largest independent investment dealer in Canada.  The firm focuses on growth companies, with operations in 10 countries worldwide and the ability to list companies on 10 stock exchanges. Canaccord Genuity, the international capital markets division, is based in Canada, with offices in the US, the UK, France, Germany, Ireland, Hong Kong, China, Singapore, Australia and Barbados. In 2018, Canaccord raised $34.5bn for global growth companies and issued 455 financings worldwide.

About CLS Holdings USA, Inc.

CLS Holdings USA, Inc. (CLSH) is a diversified cannabis company that acts as an integrated cannabis producer and retailer through its Oasis Cannabis subsidiaries in Nevada and plans to expand to other states. CLS stands for “Cannabis Life Sciences,” in recognition of the Company’s patented proprietary method of extracting various cannabinoids from the marijuana plant and converting them into products with a higher level of quality and consistency. The Company’s business model includes licensing operations, processing operations, processing facilities, sale of products, brand creation and consulting services.

http://www.clsholdingsinc.com

Twitter: @CLSHusa

About Oasis Cannabis

Oasis Cannabis has operated a cannabis dispensary in the Las Vegas market since dispensaries first opened in Nevada in 2015 and has been recognized as one of the top marijuana retailers in the state. Its location within walking distance to the Las Vegas Strip and Downtown Las Vegas in combination with its delivery service to residents allows it to efficiently serve both locals and tourists in the Las Vegas area. In February 2019, it was named “Best Dispensary for Pot Pros” by Desert Companion Magazine. In August 2017, the company commenced wholesale offerings of cannabis in Nevada with the launch of its City Trees brand of cannabis concentrates and cannabis-infused products.

http://oasiscannabis.com

About City Trees

Founded in 2017, City Trees is a Nevada based cannabis cultivation, production and distribution company. Offering a wide variety of products with consistent results, City Trees is one the fastest growing wholesale companies in the industry. Its products are now available at 44 dispensaries.

https://citytrees.com

Forward Looking Statements 

This press release contains certain ”forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation and ”forward-looking statements” as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (collectively, the ”forward-looking statements”). These statements relate to anticipated future events, future results of operations or future financial performance, and anticipated growth. In some cases, you can identify forward looking statements by terminology such as ”may,” ”might,” ”will,” ”should,” ”intends,” ”expects,” ”plans,” ”goals,” ”projects,” ”anticipates,” ”believes,” ”estimates,” ”predicts,” ”potential,” or ”continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements are only predictions, are uncertain and involve substantial known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our actual results, levels of activity or performance to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity or performance expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.  We cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity or performance and we cannot guaranty that the proposed transactions described in this press release will occur. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date that they were made. These cautionary statements should be considered together with any written or oral forward-looking statements that we may issue in the future. Except as required by applicable law, we do not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to reflect actual results, later events or circumstances or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. See CLS Holdings USA filings with the SEC and on its SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com for additional details.

Published at Tue, 25 Jun 2019 12:49:04 +0000

 The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc. (SPRWF) (FIRE.TO) Launches Premium Cannabis Oil in Partnership with Wiz Khalifa

 The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc. (SPRWF) (FIRE.TO) Launches Premium Cannabis Oil in Partnership with Wiz Khalifa

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc. (“Supreme Cannabis” or the “Company”) (FIRE.TO) (SPRWF) (53S1.F), in partnership with Khalifa Kush Enterprises Canada ULC (“KKE”), today launched KKE Oil, the first product under the KKE brand line.

KKE Oil is a premium, recreational focused oil, developed for the consumer who wants the convenience, high THC potency and precise dosing offered by a cannabis oil. KKE Oils are one of the first ever recreational-focused cannabis oils available to consumers in CanadaWiz Khalifa and the KKE team specifically selected the Supreme Cannabis’ wholly-owned subsidiary, 7ACRES Sensi Star strain for the debut of the line.

“I’m excited to bring our first products to Canada and launch KKE Oils. They are an awesome, high-in-THC product that everyone will love,” said Wiz Khalifa, principal of KKE. “This is a legendary moment that will be followed by many more game changing releases KKE will launch with Supreme Cannabis over the next year.

“We firmly believe that a high-quality input supports high-quality output and KKE Oil embodies this belief. We are excited to launch one of the first recreational focused cannabis oils in Canada with Wiz Khalifa and the KKE team. KKE Oils are easy to consume, effective and deliver the aromatic terpene profile 7ACRES’ Sensi Star is known for. We can’t wait to launch the full suite of KKE products, including KKE Jean Guy Oil, later this year,” said John Fowler, President and Founder of Supreme Cannabis.

Canada will be the first country outside the United States to experience KKE branded products. KKE Oil is expected to be available for purchase in British Columbia and Ontario by the end of the week, Alberta in early July and released to other Canadian provinces throughout the year. KKE Oils are the first in a full suite of recreational focused products expected to be created under the previously announced partnership between Supreme Cannabis and KKE.

Learn more at KKE.CA and follow KKE on Instagram and Twitter at @kkeglobal for the latest news.

About Supreme Cannabis

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc., is a global diversified portfolio of distinct cannabis companies, products and brands. Since 2014, the Company has emerged as one of the world’s fastest-growing, premium plant driven-lifestyle companies by effectively deploying capital, with an emphasis on disciplined growth and high-quality products.

Supreme Cannabis’ portfolio includes 7ACRES, its wholly-owned subsidiary and multi-award-winning brand; Cambium Plant Sciences, a plant genetics and cultivation IP company; Medigrow Lesotho, a cannabis oil producer located in southern Africa; and a brand partnership and licensing deal with Khalifa Kush Enterprises Canada.

Supreme trades as FIRE on the Toronto Stock Exchange (FIRE.TO), SPRWF on the OTC Exchange in the United States (SPRWF) and 53S1 on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange (53S1.F). Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

We simply grow better.

About Khalifa Kush Enterprises Canada

Khalifa Kush Enterprises Canada was founded in 2018 and is the first expansion for Khalifa Kush outside of the U.S. with plans for growth in additional countries all over the world.

Khalifa Kush products were first commercialized in the U.S. in 2015 by multi-platinum, Grammy and Golden Globe nominated recording artist Wiz Khalifa and his long-time business associates Will Dzombak (CEO, Taylor Gang), Tim Hunkele (Vice President, Taylor Gang) and Constance Schwartz (Founder and CEO, SMAC Entertainment). The company has achieved much success with the creation of high quality and highly sought-after products in the legalized marijuana market and are currently available for purchase in Nevada and Arizona.

Forward-Looking Information

Certain statements made in this press release may constitute forward-looking information under applicable securities laws. These statements may relate to anticipated events or results and include, but are not limited to, the quality and characteristics of the KKE Oils, the development and distribution of KKE Oils and other statements that are not historical facts. Particularly, information regarding our expectations of future results, targets, performance achievements, prospects or opportunities is forward-looking information. Often, but not always, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “believe”, “estimate”, “plan”, “could”, “should”, “would”, “outlook”, “forecast”, “anticipate”, “foresee”, “continue” or the negative of these terms or variations of them or similar terminology. Forward-looking statements are current as of the date they are made and are based on applicable estimates and assumptions made by us at the relevant time in light of our experience and perception of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments, as well as other factors that we believe are appropriate and reasonable in the circumstances. However, we do not undertake to update any such forward-looking information whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required under applicable securities laws in Canada. There can be no assurance that such estimates and assumptions will prove to be correct. Many factors could cause our actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements or future events or developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, the factors discussed in the “Risk Factors” section of the Company’s Annual Information Form dated October 2, 2018 (“AIF”). A copy of the AIF and the Company’s other publicly filed documents can be accessed under the Company’s profile on the System for Electronic Document Analysis and Retrieval (“SEDAR”) at www.sedar.com. The Company cautions that the list of risk factors and uncertainties described in the AIF is not exhaustive and other factors could also adversely affect its results. Readers are urged to consider the risks, uncertainties and assumptions carefully in evaluating the forward-looking information and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such information.

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc. (CNW Group/The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc.)

The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc. (CNW Group/The Supreme Cannabis Company, Inc.)

Cision

Cision

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Published at Tue, 25 Jun 2019 12:52:10 +0000

Leafbuyer Technologies Inc (OTCMKTS:LBUY) And CBD.io Leverages Expanding Customer Base To Increase The Attendance And Booth Count To 15,000 And 400

Leafbuyer Technologies Inc (OTCMKTS:LBUY) And CBD.io Leverages Expanding Customer Base To Increase The Attendance And Booth Count To 15,000 And 400

Leafbuyer Technologies Inc (OTCMKTS:LBUY) has partnered
with CBD.io, a trade show partner in Las Vegas. Both companies are leveraging
their customer base to improve the attendees and booth count to 15,000 and over
400, respectively.

Adds ten new contracts

Leafbuyer has added ten new contracts since
signing a Letter of Intent with CBD.io on June 5, 2019. The booth space is
oversold by 50% and expects a sellout date in mid-summer. Chief Operating
Officer of Leafbuyer, Mark Breen said both the firms could not miss an
opportunity to work and move towards the common target of offering more value
to the customers and generate huge revenues.

The clients of Leafbuyer get an opportunity in
advertising packs to unlock immense value. They get full access to the consumer
base of Leafbuyer and find a place in CBD.io trade show at the price of one
package. The customers can interact with the buyers and customers via Leafbuyer
network.

Visible and
largest expos

CBD.io operates the most visible and largest
trade shows for Vape and CBD industries. The expos organized by the company in
2018 hosted prominent names in the industry like Diamond CBD, Blue Moon Hemp,
GRN, CBDistillery, and Stanley Brothers. The representatives of GNC, Walmart,
and Costco also attended the expos held in 2018.

Chief Marketing Officer of CBD.io, Michael
McNeely said working together with Leafbuyer helps to share the immense
opportunity of CBD.io with a bigger consumer market and diversify the
audiences. The company immediately teamed up with Leafbuyer after its
introduction to include the client base of Leafbuyer to its trade show. CBD.io
is bringing talented professionals from across the world for industry topic
discussions and talk about the present, past, and future of cannabidiol.

CBD.io trade
show during 22-23, November

CBD.io will organize a trade show during
November 22 and 23, 2019 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. The participating
retailers are Green Trees, Discover CBD, Rocky Mountain Bob’s CBD Chewing Gum,
Experience CBD, Steve’s Goods, and Chronic Candy.

Signs LOI to
take over CBI trade show

Leafbuyer signed an LOI on June 5, 2019, to
take over CBD trade show. The company also gains ownership in an e-commerce
website that sells retail and wholesale CBD products.

Leafbuyer has announced an increase of 70% in
sales in Q1 2019. It is on the backdrop of intense sales efforts. Its plans to
increase client base going forward.

Published at Tue, 25 Jun 2019 12:15:10 +0000

Marijuana Business This Week: Vermont hemp hearings, Michigan cannabis warning labels, Medicine Man update & more

Marijuana Business This Week: Vermont hemp hearings, Michigan cannabis warning labels, Medicine Man update & more

Here are some notable stories and events to watch for in the coming days:

VERMONT HEMP HEARINGS: The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets (AAFM) will hold its first public hearings to discuss the rulemaking process for the state’s hemp program.

The hearings are scheduled for Thursday in Brandon and Friday in Newport.

According to the official state website, the AAFM must adopt rules establishing how the agency will conduct research within its hemp program and set requirements for the registration of growers of hemp crops and processors of hemp and hemp-infused products.

The AAFM submitted the proposed hemp rules to the secretary of state’s office on May 17. The last day for public comment is July 5.

MICHIGAN WEIGHS WARNINGS: Testimony is expected to continue this week in Michigan on legislation that would require putting health warning labels on marijuana products.

According to Kalamazoo TV station WWMT, the bill, sponsored by Republican Reps. Thomas Albert and Daire Rendon, calls for the state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs to ensure the labeling is implemented.

The labels would carry this message:

“Warning: Use by pregnant or breastfeeding women, or by women planning to become pregnant, may result in fetal injury, preterm birth, low birth weight, or developmental problems for the child.”

MEDICINE MAN UPDATE: Medicine Man Technologies, the Denver-based vertically integrated cannabis operator, has scheduled a corporate update call for investors on Tuesday.

CEO Andy Williams, Chief Operating Officer Joe Puglise and board chair Justin Dye will be on the call to take queries from investors and to discuss the firm’s future and pending acquisitions.

Earlier this month, Medicine Man agreed to acquire Los Sueños Farms, Colorado’s largest cannabis grower, and MesaPur, a local manufacturing and dispensary company in the state.

CALIFORNIA COMMITTEE CONVENING: California’s Cannabis Advisory Committee will hold three subcommittee meetings on Thursday and a full committee meeting the next day in Los Angeles.

On Thursday:

  • The Subcommittee on Equity will discuss topics including state and local definitions of a social equity applicant; business development and educational services for applicants; income limits for applicants; state equity programs versus local equity programs; and funding for social equity programs.
  • The Subcommittee on Delivery will examine recommendations related to cannabis delivery operations, including balancing local control and patient access; disclosure of premises address on delivery receipt; and operating hours for delivery services.
  • The Subcommittee on Testing Laboratories will look at topics such as CBD and industrial hemp safety standards, testing regulations and standardization; reference standards and stability testing; illicit market activity and enforcement; and taxation.

On Friday, the full committee hearing will review the issues discussed and actions taken by the three subcommittees the previous day.

MISSOURI MMJ SIGN-UP: Only weeks after the dispensary license application process began, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services on Friday will begin accepting applications from patients for medical marijuana ID cards – a key step for getting the MMJ industry off the ground.

The Columbia Missourian reported the department moved up the date to begin the process six days earlier than the original July 4 deadline.

EXPIRING LICENSE SCORECARD: There are 55 cultivation licenses set to expire this week in California, according to an analysis of state license data by Marijuana Business Daily.

Published at Mon, 24 Jun 2019 10:30:36 +0000

Legalization Bill Dies in New York Legislature, California Will Extend Provisional Cannabis Licenses: Week in Review

Legalization Bill Dies in New York Legislature, California Will Extend Provisional Cannabis Licenses: Week in Review

During the days of full cannabis prohibition, there was essentially a free market at work. With a high-risk marketplace and an obscure market of producers and consumers, growers and breeders competed freely—resulting in the incredible variety of genetically diverse plants that a maturing marketplace now demands.

But because of the underground nature of it all, every business was run on unprotected trade secrets. Breeders were known by pseudonyms and the sometimes-ridiculous cultivar names used for marketing. As the industry emerged, websites like Leafly.com appeared to catalog them all. But as the industry matured, along came genetic sequencers to show that a lot of the plants were the same thing and the vast majority of the varieties on the market were neither new nor unique.

And, despite the newly emerging genomics and federal prohibition, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has been issuing both variety and utility patents for cannabis varieties, triggering industry groups and labs to begin open-sourcing genetic and chemical profiles of plants on legal markets in an attempt to prove prior art and prevent more broad utility patents on plants.

Cannabis patent plants
Miller

Variety patents, which are issued for all kinds of plants under the Plant Variety Protection Act of 1970 (PVPA), are issued only for plants that were asexually produced (clones) and are not found in nature, but rather the dedicated work of a breeder to create something new and unique. Variety patents last 25 years and allow breeders to have total control over their creation, including charging licensing fees and/or royalties if they enter into a contract with a producer.

Utility patents, on the other hand, usually apply to new methods of delivery (like vaporizers) or new processes (a new extraction device). But in 2015, a very controversial patent was issued to a biopharmaceutical firm, Biotech Institute LLC. The issued plant patent is so incredibly broad in scope that the vast majority of landrace varieties (or Type-II varieties) fit within their scope; plants that make both THC and CBD and are not dominant in the terpene myrcene. 

The power of these patents lies in the cost of litigation. Oftentimes when a small company or similar-sized competitor infringes on the patent, whether knowingly or not, it is usually a lot cheaper to pay the patent holder a licensing fee than it is to go to court. If the patent is challenged and the defendant proves prior art, the patent could be invalidated.

Breeders derive all the value in their work from intellectual property (IP), so as the marketplace matures, investing in the appropriate protections is essential. Obtaining plant varieties and investing in an insurance plan that can cover costs of litigation— whether offensive of defensive— is key to protecting the core value of the business. 

Protecting Genetic Assets

“The best way to protect your genetic assets is with plant patents, that is the safest thing to do, protect them strain by strain,” says Dale Hunt, a plant biologist and attorney specializing in cannabis patents.

According to Hunt, the standard that the USPTO applies to cannabis plant variety applications is no different than for any other plant; the cultivar must be new, useful and nonobvious, and the application must teach a person skilled in the art how to make the invention and how to use the invention. Plant patents are relatively inexpensive and easy to defend, and they are less likely to be invalidated by legal challenges—like a utility patent might.

Hunt says that the effects of utility patents like Biotech Institute’s remain to be seen because they have yet to be enforced or tested.

“With so little prior art there will always be a question mark over the utility patents. You will never know how valid they are until more literature is developed,” he says. “If you are worried about having people assert their broad utility patents against you, you need to be part of a coalition of people in the same boat who believe this and band together to defend yourself and each other against those patents.”

Hunt plans to release a new website, MJPatentsWeekly, that will be updated every Tuesday as the USPTO issues new patents. Visitors to the site can comment on patents and submit prior art, which he says is key to preventing more broad utility patents.  

“The cannabis industry has been a pretty active industry with people doing a lot of innovative things, but have they created a body of literature?” he asks. “Of course not, they have hidden it pretty vigorously. There is a great void of any information that is printed that an examiner can look at. The examiner, their hands are kinda tied.”

Hunt says there are a lot of ways growers can protect their plants other than through patents. Growers can control their protections by only selling harvested material rather than clones or seeds. In countries with legalized cannabis but few legal IP protections, strong contracts are the best option for mitigating the risk.

Applying for a Patent

Hunt says the application process is relatively simple, although it is still standard for the patent examiner to reject the patent application on the first pass, particularly in the case of utility patents. He says the reason most applications are rejected on first submission is because it is important for the patent examiner to create a written record of the dialogue between the USPTO and the applicant in order to ensure the patent is valid. This creates a record that is open to the public over the review and analysis process.

He says for variety patents, the issue is usually because documentation provided to the USPTO examiner does not sufficiently describe the new variety.

Hunt details the other three primary reasons the application could be rejected at first submission in a post to his blog called “Three Rookie Mistakes Plant Patent Applicants Make,” (1) naming the variety in a way that is incompatible with trademark protection; (2) misunderstanding the flexibility of filing date and disclosure requirements and (3) incorrectly timing the filing of the application.

“What you don’t want to do is use your really cool, sexy trade name as your variety name when you apply for the patent, because you lose the ability to use that as a trademark,” he says. “You want a functional, non-appealing name, like an address or filing system kind of name. My clients have learned from making that mistake or others’ mistakes; they use some sort of code so they can track it, and an appealing name for the trademark.”

Enforcing a Patent

“It is one thing to get a patent, it is another thing to enforce one,” Hunt says.

With the average cost of litigation averaging $2.8 million for patent infringement lawsuits, according to Gil Shaheen with Intellectual Property Insurance Services Corporation (IPISC), a business could go bankrupt if its management tries to challenge the patent enforcer, even if they feel they have a case to challenge it. If a small business has an insurance policy that covers defensive and offensive litigation, they could potentially invalidate patents like Biotech’s.

“The interesting thing about cannabis patent landscape, and the utility patent, with so little printed prior art for the examiners to go on and so much black market prior art or hidden prior art that a defendant could use in their defense, when someone asserts the patent they are really risking having it invalidated,” Hunt says. “As soon as I sue someone for infringing a patent they get an army of lawyers, some experts and some patent searchers and they throw all kinds of resources at trying to prove my patent is invalid. They are going to do a more thorough search and any examiner would have ability to do.”

Hunt adds that everyone—whether longtime growers or experienced business professionals—is new to the legal industry, and, in many cases, there just isn’t precedent yet on cannabis industry intellectual property.

“Because everyone is new, be really careful in evaluating what qualifies the people you choose to work with—whether they are on the investment side or the business side or the lawyer’s side,” Hunt concludes.

Insurance policies that cover the cost of enforcing a company’s patent, or protecting them from an infringement suit, are the best defense of both the company and its most important assets.

Published at Sat, 22 Jun 2019 13:00:00 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000






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